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Benefit
Lectures

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Albrecht Dürer:
Pioneer of the Northern Renaissance

August 28, 2022 (Sunday)

          4:00–5:30pm Eastern Time (UTC-5:00)

          3:00–4:30pm Central Time (UTC-6:00)

          1:00–2:30pm Pacific Time (UTC-8:00)

Presenter: Jonathan J. Armstrong, Ph.D.

Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528) is sometimes described as the "Renaissance Man" of the Northern Renaissance―the flourishing of artistic achievement north of the Alps in the 1500s. An artistic genius best known for his exquisite woodcuts, Dürer pioneered several conventions that signal the transition from the Middle Ages to Renaissance in art history. This lecture will showcase Jonathan's photographs from the Albrecht Dürer House and the Germanisches Nationalmuseum in Nuremburg.

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The Egyptian Shape of Our Alphabet

October 23, 2022 (Sunday)

          4:00–5:30pm Eastern Time (UTC-5:00)

          3:00–4:30pm Central Time (UTC-6:00)

          1:00–2:30pm Pacific Time (UTC-8:00)

Presenter: Brian Donnelly-Lewis

Some may know the story of the birth of the alphabet, scrawled on rocks and stones in the Sinai desert. Similarly, some may know of the alphabet’s meteoric rise from relative obscurity, becoming the favored script of the Phoenicians, Hebrews, Greeks and then the world. Few, however, know the story of the alphabet’s maturation―the people, places, and times that shaped it in its formative years. What, we might ask, happened to the alphabet in the years between its birth and its rise to prominence? What events, if any, precipitated its rise? And who, if anyone, was responsible for perpetuating this radical new technology in the early years out of Sinai? Only recently, several inscriptions discovered in excavations in Israel have begun to provide some clues as to answers to these and other tantalizing questions. In this lecture, Brian Donnelly-Lewis (Ph.D. Candidate in Near Eastern Languages at the University of California, Los Angeles) will present new research that brings a fresh perspective to these recent finds and brings them into conversation with their socio-political world in order to tell the story of the shaping of the alphabet―far after its birth in Sinai but just before its adoption by the world.

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Saint Paul in Ancient Corinth:
Archaeology and the Early Church

February 19, 2023 (Sunday)

          4:00–5:30pm Eastern Time (UTC-5:00)

          3:00–4:30pm Central Time (UTC-6:00)

          1:00–2:30pm Pacific Time (UTC-8:00)

Presenter: Jonathan J. Armstrong, Ph.D.

The American School of Classical Studies has excavated ancient Corinth since 1896, rendering this one of the most comprehensively researched archaeological sites to be of significance in the biblical record. This lecture will take the form of a virtual tour, showing what visitors can see at the site today and how Saint Paul would have experienced the site in the first century. We will also examine how the features of the ancient city show through in the literary record that Saint Paul leaves for us in his correspondence with the church at Corinth in our New Testaments. This lecture will showcase Jonathan's photographs from the archaeological site of ancient Corinth in Greece.

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The Israel Museum in Jerusalem

May 8, 2023 (Sunday)

          4:00–5:30pm Eastern Time (UTC-5:00)

          3:00–4:30pm Central Time (UTC-6:00)

          1:00–2:30pm Pacific Time (UTC-8:00)

Presenter: Brian Donnely-Lewis

In this lecture, Brian Donnely-Lewis, Fellow of the Albright Institute of Archaeological Research in Jerusalem, will present on his research in the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

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Matthew Dereck
Director of Courses

 

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